5 indigo ride around the lake

The ride will start near the foot bridge to Aspen Island (the carillon) at 12 noon and finish  around 1:30.

The full circuit is about 30 kilometres.  Faster riders might like to add in a side trip to the top of Dairy Farmer’s hill in the Arboretum.  Slower riders could cut off the East Basin.  We would like to know who is joining us at least the day before so we can ensure sufficient sandwiches and drinks at the end.

The donation site is here.  There is no need, but individual riders may add their names as team members.

Please email us at tidbinbilla@grapevine.net.au.

 

 

BillBerry Cycling

This site is about about bicycling – mainly bicycle touring.  It was originally established to present Freda (Bill) Cole’s journal of a 1939 bicycle tour of Europe and the journal of the repeat of that tour seven decades on.  Click on ” Europe Twice Around – On the eve of war and seven decades on – by bicycle”  (tab 1) for this.

Bill’s friend Berry pedalled with her out of their home town of Worcester on 16 April 1939.  These two young women were dedicated members of the Girl Guide Movement and remained so all their lives.  The Scout/Guide Movement is in very large part about leadership and thus, for the Guides, women’s empowerment.  So, in repeating of the 1939 ride we took the opportunity to promote the work of the Scout/Guide Movement on women’s empowerment especially in the developing world.

We established the BillBerry Blue Stocking Fund (tab 4) to help contribute to resourcing such work and its income goes to the indigo foundation for this purpose.  A ride from Canberra to Melbourne (tab 2) raised about $10,000 for this and the Sydney to Summit ride in April 2016 (tab 3) is planned to raise thousands more.

 

Readers of this site might be interested in gryphonwritings though they are not about cycling.

 

 

 

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

3- Sea to Summit

 1 Sydney to Kosciuszko

From the MAMIL Champions

On 2 April 2016 we are again going for a ride and raising funds for the indigo foundation’s projects supporting women’s empowerment in developing countries.

We welcome anyone who wishes to join us on the ride. And you don’t have to be a MAMIL! We welcome MAWILs, YWILs and YMILs. Read more about the ride below.

The Route

Day 1 (2/4/2016) Sydney to Wollongong 93kms (9kms gravel), 1105ms tv (total vertical)  or 102kms with no gravel and a bit more vertical
Day 2 (3/4/2016) Wollongong to Nowra 81kms, 612ms tv
Day 3 (4/4/2016) Nowra to Braidwood 121kms (17kms gravel), 1623ms tv
Day 4 (5/4/2016) Braidwood to Canberra 105kms (20kms gravel), 1193ms tv
Day 5 (6/4/2016) in Canberra – the best 30km ride in the country – around the lake.  some might add Mt Stromlo to make it the best 50km ride
Day 6 (7/4/2016) Canberra to Adaminaby 116 kms (40kms gravel), 1900ms tv
Day 7 (8/4/2016) Adaminaby to Jindabyne 98 kms, 1258ms tv
Day 8 (9/4/2016) Jindabyne to Kosciuszko and back 100 kms (15kms gravel),
1807ms tv

Total – 664 km to the summit plus 50 back to Jindabyne
Total vertical metres – 9498 – quite a bit more than Mt Everest!

See a map of the route.  (Note – this map is not quite accurate.)

Read more details on the riding conditions each day below.

Joining the ride

You may join us for as many kilometres as you wish and leave and re-join if necessary. As we start on Saturday you might like to come for the first half day, for the first day or the first two days. Getting back to Sydney by train would be possible at various stages of the first day and the second. See train timetable here.

We are not racing!! This is a supported ride.  A SAG wagon will carry our gear and refreshments so you only need to have a bag for rain gear etc on your bike.  We expect there will be sub-groups riding at differing paces.

Level of difficulty

This is not an easy ride. A good level of bike fitness is required. Most of the days on this ride we will expect to be on the bike for 5 hours, with a couple of days requiring around 6 hours.

In 2014 we rode from Canberra to Melbourne (a similar level of difficulty) and averaged about 19 kms/hour. We six MAMILs are all the plus side of 60. If you can keep up a pace of more than 25 kph on the flat on a still day you might well be buying the first round of drinks at the end of the day.

What bike is required

Touring bikes with 35mm tyres are probably best for the ride as there are gravel sections on most days. A road bike with 23-25mm tyres would be fine for days one and two. If there aren’t too many road bikers they could be ferried over the gravel bits except for the last 15 to the summit and back.  Mountain bikes would be OK, but as most of the route is tarmac fitting high pressure, low tread tyres such as Schwalbe Marathon Plus 26 x 1.35″ would be a good idea.

The route largely uses lesser roads, but some stretches will have traffic. High visibility clothing is essential.

We also recommend that your bicycle is checked and serviced.

Cost

Anyone joining the whole ride is asked to contribute $100 to fund the support vehicle and lunch costs. For those joining only for a portion, the contribution will be $15 per day.

It should be possible to get an evening meal for around $25, to be paid individually.

We might need an additional contribution for transport back from Jindabyne. We will advise on payment arrangements in due course.

Accommodation

Shared accommodation will be available each night for around $50. Accommodation with private bathrooms will also be available for a higher price. We don’t think camping is practical in view of the long days and the extra load and time taken.

Participants must make their own accommodation bookings. It is first in first served. A number of rooms will be reserved at Braidwood and Adaminaby where there is limited accommodation. Here is suggested accommodation for the other locations:

Wollongong

Nowra

Braidwood

  • The Royal Mail Hotel – some accommodation reserved: $65 – Single room, $75 – Double room, $105 – Room with 5 beds
  • Torpy’s Eco Motel – no website: p: +61 2 4842 1830, m: 0447421830

Canberra

  •        A couple of indigo supporter have kindly offered accommodation
  •        There are many commercial options

Adaminaby

  • Snow Goose Hotel Motel  –  $45 per person in the hotel $65 per person in the motel.  Self serve continental breakfast included

Jindabyne

  •        We expect to book a couple of lodges

Insurance

We strongly recommend that you obtain personal accident insurance before taking part in the ride. Bike associations like Pedal Power in Canberra include insurance in membership fees.

Inclement weather

There is a saying that there is no such thing as bad weather just bad gear.  A blizzard on the Kosciuszko road would probably stop us, but otherwise we would probably just struggle on.  There is the SAG wagon to call if anyone is finding it too much.

Details on the route

Day One – 2 April 2016
We start at sea level below Mrs MacQuarie’s Chair at Port Jackson in Sydney. We will coffee and fuel up the Poolside Café nearby. We will follow bike paths and bike lanes to the Royal National Park. The paved road through the park has stretches with paved shoulders, but stretches where cars have to be patient to pass bikes. On Saturdays many cyclists ride this road so our bunch won’t be unusual. Those with touring bikes would probably wish to split off and use the Lady Carrington trail. There is a bit of up and down. The coast is spectacular south of the park.

Day Two – 3 April
This a pretty easy day with only 612 vertical metres. The route is pretty close to the sea most of the way.

Day Three – 4 April
The Nowra to Braidwood road has is now all sealed except for about 17kms and much of the road has good hard shoulders. The President of Nowra Velo Club advises that it is pretty quiet. On Monday it should be very quiet. The climb is long and steady from sea level to 770 metres over about 50 kms. It is grade 2. There is one short pitch at 9%. Otherwise it is under 4%. After the climb it rolls along through grazing tableland country to Braidwood.

Day Four – 5 April
This a pretty nice ride on tarmac through rolling grazing country south of Braidwood, then on gravel for 20kms through forest to Captains Flat. The Captains Flat to Queanbeyan road is a good ride. There will be a little traffic. It is bike paths then into Canberra.

Day Five – 6 April
Around the lake is the best 30km ride in the country and up Mt Stromlo makes the best 50km ! Well maybe there are contenders. There are good coffee stops too. We expect to be joined by locals for this.  The start and finish (with sandwiches) will be near the Carillon – 12 noon to about 1:30.

We will carbohydrate load at the Yarralumla pizza restaurant for dinner with family and friends including local indigo supporters.

Day Six – 7 April
This is quite a tough day, but it is a pretty spectacular ride. It includes the famous Fitz’s hill which is 11 and 12% but not very long so it is only a Grade 3 climb. There are about 40 kilometres of gravel road. We know this can be done on road bikes, but fitting the widest tyres frame clearances allow would be a good idea. On road bikes 25mm is usually the maximum.

Day Seven – 8 April
This is a rather easier day. There are 24 kms on the Snowy Mountains Highway, but this should be pretty quiet. We then do a few extra kms on back roads to Jindabyne to limit the kms on the Cooma to Jindabyne road.

Day Eight – 9 April
So this is it. A long steady climb from about 860 metres to about 1840 metres at Charlotte’s Pass on tarmac then 7.5 kms on gravel to about 2120 metres at Rawson’s Pass and finally .5 km and about 108 metres on foot up to the top of our big hill Mount Kosciuszko – 2228 metres. The ride involves a Grade 1 climb and a 2 and a 3. The maximum gradient is 11% and there is quite a bit at 7, 8, 9 and 10%. The run back down will chew up the brake pads! We hope there won’t be snow!

Getting Home

Watch this space. There will be a couple of cars going back to Canberra and one to Sydney. Depending on numbers we will seek volunteers to help or we may beg, borrow or steal a mini-bus and trailer to get riders and bikes back to Canberra and Sydney. The only public transport from Jindabyne seems to be a Countrylink bus on Monday morning at 8:20.

For more information please email Robin Brown at tidbinbilla@grapevine.net.au

 

Akihiko’s Ride

A friend from Japan, Akihiko Sumnami, did part of this ride from Canberra to Kosciuszko in 2015.  Here is his journal.

Hello all
My name is Akihiko Sunami from Tokyo, Japan.  I planned to participate in the Sydney to Summit ride during my visit to Australia.  When it had to be cancelled Robin suggested I might like to a solo ride from Canberra to the Summit in 3days.

When I arrived Canberra we found perfect weather was forecast for next few days so I decided to take the challenge to the Summit!

Day1
From Canberra (Tharwa) to Adaminaby, thru NAMADGI NATIONAL PARK.
(total 80km includes 40km gravel)

Setting off from Tharwa

Setting off from Tharwa on Robin’s Airnimal

On the long climb on the Boboyan Road

On the long climb on the Boboyan Road

Gravel Road, it was tough enough, I could feel the power of the Australian land!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arriving Adaminaby. YES! Trout!

4

Refreshment at the Snow Goose Hotel – Robin said there probably would not be craft beer and advised that VB was a good option!

5

DAY2 Adaminaby to Jindabyne (total distance 98km)

Breakfast at Snow Goose hotel in Adaminaby – Vegemite with butter! This was also Robin’s advice.

6

Met 3 bicycle travellers in Berriedale. Alan & John are traveling from Bendigo to Canberra to meet Alan’s Daughter. Alan is 70. John is 67. Damian, from France was on a 3 year trip from Sydney to Adelaide to Darwin then on to many Asian country’s.

7

Damian’s serious titanium travel mountain bike with trailer8

Arriving at Jindabyne Lake 9

 

About half way to the summit 10

 

11

 

 

 

 

This is last 100m up, you have to park your bicycle and walk to the top. Here are Australia’s highest toilets and bicycle parking!!!

 

At the summit! The highest point on the Australian mainland! 2228m!1213

14 Wild refule station on the way!

Day4 Jindabyne to Canberra on bus by NSW Travel Link
A night to relax and rest after the 3 days of riding. Next morning at 8:20AM the bus to Canberra departed from in front of Jindabyne tourist info center. Arrived Canberra at 10:37AM.

 

 

 

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

2- MAMIL Champions Cycling for Change in the Pacific

Cycling for the Solomons and Power for Women of the Pacific

 

For the blog of the Canberra to Melbourne ride scroll down

 

Give her the power to lead
She is a girl in a poor Solomon Islands village. She is bright, but opportunities for her are not as bright as they could be.

You can help make her a leader so she can help lead her village and her nation to a brighter future. Your donation (tax deductible for Australian citizens) will support a civic education and leadership program for young women of Solomon Islands. In that country very few women have had the chance to develop their leadership skills. There is not one in the parliament. Women leaders in developing countries make a big difference to how well they are governed and especially how well girls are educated. And studies show that every educated girl brings about four others in her community out of poverty. Advancement of women is not only a women’s interest issue, but integral to a country’s development. This program is being developed by the not for profit overseas development organisation, the indigo foundation.

From the lake to the bay
On 7 May 2014 half a dozen MAMILs (middle aged men in lycra) are riding 1,000 kilometres from Canberra to Melbourne – from Lake Burley Griffin to Port Philip Bay. Click here for the route.

For each of those kilometres we are pedalling through the wind and rain (and maybe snow on the Monaro High Plain!) we’d like an incentive. We’ll do each kilometre for 2 or 5 or 10 of your cents, but if you can give a dollar per kilometre or 2 or 3 or 4 or more we are sure our legs won’t get so tired.

With the support of several donors (in connection with the BillBerry Ride and the Foundation for Effective Markets and Governance (FEMAG) and the Australian National University’s (ANU) Regulatory Institutions Network (RegNet), the funding is now about $50,000. The indigo foundation program team has just been to Solomon Islands (during the flood catastrophe) and a development memorandum of understanding proposed by the Australian team was enthusiastically endorsed by the local partner organization, the Solomon Islands Girl Guides Association. The plan is for the program to actually get under way by the end of the year.

The ultimate dream, after piloting the program in Solomon Islands, is see it spread to our other small Pacific neighbours as they learn of its success and seek similar support. To achieve all this we’ll need an annual income of at least $10,000 and therefore invested funds of at least $200,000.

Virginia Haussegger* has agreed to send off the riders on the morning of 7 May. A modest event is contemplated to which you would be invited though those outside Canberra would not be expected to make it!

How to Donate
Donations may be made by credit card at this website: https://forms.act.gov.au/smartform/public/FormServer?formId=1058
You will find a drop down menu under “to fund”. Select BillBerry Blue Stocking Fund (indigo foundation)

Alternatively bank transfers may be made to this account:
Account Name: Public Trustee Common Fund
BSB: 062-920 Acc No: 1003 6944
Reference: 141282

For a tax deductible receipt send an email to public.trustee@act.gov.au

Any contribution will help. Whether or not you are able to donate, and we especially appreciate that some of our younger friends won’t have much disposable income, we would be very, very grateful if you would encourage donations from anyone you think might be interested. We would really appreciate anything you can do to tell to everyone you know about this great opportunity to help make a brighter future for our poorest neighbours. We are sure people concerned about empowerment of women, and especially people who want to help the Girl Guide/Scout Movement to develop leaders, will want to contribute. There are millions of former Girl Guides and Scouts in Australia who, given the opportunity to support GG/Scout work in developing countries, would contribute, so we very much want to connect to as many of them as we can. If you know any please let them know.

You can find about

• the indigo foundation at www.indigofoundation.org
• FEMAG at http://www.femag.org.au

• RegNet at http://www.regnet.anu.edu.au

Don’t hesitate to ask for more details.

Founders of the BillBerry Fund
Robin Brown, Jill McSpedden, Anna Brown, Richard Arthur and Allan and Lois Asher.

And the riders
Robin, Rick, Allan, Lew, John and Philip
* Virginia is a journalist, ABC news presenter, author, member of the National Committee Board of UN Women and key supporter of indigo foundation.

 

BLOG

MAMIL Champions Cycling for Change in the Pacific

 

imageDays One and Two

Canberra to Captains Flat – 73 kilometres, 811 metres climbed

Captains Flat to Cooma – 103 kilometres, 1603 metres climbed

Thank you so much to all those who turned out on a chilly Canberra morning to support our ride and our cause, to all who have sent good wishes and generous donations, to Virginia Haussegger who launched the ride and the cause with the clearest message about the need to empower women in the developing world, to all the Burgmann College people who helped and to the College for its generosity in hosting the event which meant extra dollars for the indigo foundation’s work.

The first two days are done and they were fabulous. The wind wasn’t at our back on the first day, from Canberra to Captains Flat (73 kms and 811 vertical metres), but it died away and on the second to Cooma (103 kms and 1603 metres vertical) was hardly evident. The sun shone on the beauty of the tablelands nearly all the time.

(Click on the photos to expand)

 

A testing climb past the mine tailing hill

A testing climb past the mine tailing hill

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Day Three

Cooma to Delegate – 138 kilometres, 1503 metres climbed

It was minus 4 for our departure from Cooma with a quite thick freezing fog. We climbed up out of the fog at about 950 metres into a sunny day on the Monaro High Plain with a breeze of about 18 kms per hour behind us! At our highest point (1100 metres) we had a grand view of the Snowy Mountains complete with a good dusting of snow. We descended to about 800 metres for hot coffee and traditional pink iced fruit bun from Cooma provided by our wonderful sag wagon driver Lois.

After climbing to 1000 metres again we had a thrilling 250 metre descent to the valley of the McLaughlin River. It might well have been named such because the landscape does look a bit like parts of Scotland. In Bibbenluke Lois spoilt us with hot bowls of bean casserole. After a pretty quick coffee in Bombala, we raced against the failing light for the Delegate Pub with a magnificent sunset taking our attention away from the road. Very well fed we are all off early to bed to recuperate from 140 kms and 1583 metres climbed. Tomorrow will be another big day.

 

Day Four

Delegate to Orbost – 126 kilometres, 1245 metres climbed

imageNot quite such a cold start from Delegate today, but it was a few kilometres before our fingers thawed out. Once they had we were able to operate the binoculars to observe a flock of shelducks helping themselves to a crop of some sort. The morning sun shone on this beautiful rolling upland grazing country for half an hour before a greying sky threatened.

Immediately crossing the border to Victoria cleared fields gave way to magnificent mountain ash forest. Lyrebirds and black wallabies dashed across the road. The rain came and went and came again. Lois again did us proud with hot and spicy lentil soup for lunch which we enjoyed with the added benefit of watching a large machine demolishing a couple of trees killed in the bush fire that ravaged many square kilometres of these forests recently.

From 750 metres at Delegate we climbed (a total of 1129 metres) and descended about three or four or more times over 126 kilometres today to the Club Hotel ($30 each for the night) at Orbost at 34 metres above sea level.

Day Five

Orbost to Bairnsdale – 102 kilometres, 538 metres climbed

A little mist drifted over the dairy fields around Orbost as we set out over the Snowy River on the East Gippsland rail trail. The first few kilometres were a bit worrying as the trail was laid with lumpy, bouncy river gravel. The surface changed to finer gravel, sometimes too fine and, with the recent rain, sticky and boggy. The pace we managed would have got us to Bairnsdale before dark, but for a couple of punctures and an essential ale each at the Bullant brewery at Bruthen. The day was punctuated with magnificent views through the trees by the old railway across East Gippsland’s arcadian landscape. The contrast with the temperate rainforest and rushing streams of yesterday and the endless expanse of the Monaro the day before is stunning.

The deftly fashioned giant trestle bridges the trains chugged across for 60 years impressed us. But so did the very handsome red bellied black snake that a local informed us greets all the passing cyclists at the side of the Stony Creek bridge – the largest remaining bridge of its kind in Victoria. The friesian cows illuminated against the green hills by the setting sun made negotiating the last 10 kilometres into Bairnsdale in the dark worthwhile.

Thankfully we did not have to ride across it

Thankfully we did not have to ride across it

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Day 6

Bairnsdale to Traralgon – 130 kilometres, 362 metres climbed

The sun shone on us again today and the wind was merely a zephyr. We swung to the south of the Prince’s highway via Meerlieu. Did someone get the spelling of “milieu” wrong? We were treated to a heart-stopping display of Immelman turns and Cobras and loop the loops by one of the the RAAF Roulettes. A wedge tailed eagle just 30 metres above our heads stimulated a couple of magpies to mimic the Roulette in their efforts to see him off their patch. Cattle egret stalked around the dairy cows patiently waiting for insects to be stirred up. While hundreds of ibis poked around for their brunch a few soared high overhead along with a couple of pelicans.

We missed the Shakespeare Festival at Stratford upon Avon by a couple of days. Here started another rail “trial”. Well it is called a trail, but with parts substantially decorated with horse manure and divots created by hooves and a surface that was often like pushing a blunt knife through frozen butter it was sometimes a bit of a trial.

From Stratford, our first coffee stop, which was not a moment too soon, we were joined by honorary MAMIL Jenny (Philip’s wife) whom Lois met off the train as arranged. At Maffra the bike shop forewent substantial custom by skiving off for 5 minutes.

The trail was really good until Heyfield where the aforementioned horse damage started. We opted for the road for a bit then more trail then road again. A couple of us chose to try the newly opened section of the trail from Glengarry to Traralgon. The surface here was much firmer and this fine way to recycle this historic social asset we greatly enjoyed. The other group stayed on the road, head down on the verge with traffic building as Traralgon neared.

Through the day the verdant pastures of Gippsland were occasionally separated by stands of native flora. In the final kilometres the sinking sun touched everything with gold.

Day 7

Traralgon to Drouin – 88 kilometres, 696 metres climbed

20140513_090258

Is there another way without fog and logging trucks?

We pedalled out of Traralgon past its magnificent red brick post office and court buildings and then wound our way through the hills to North Yallourn in thick fog. This was made more than a little exciting by the log trucks going both ways, some with huge mountain ash logs bound for the paper mill and some with pinus radiata bound for the saw mill.

Yallourn power station appeared out of the fog. With its quietly steaming, elegantly curved cooling towers, strangely proportioned as the violin family of instruments, standing against the rising sun it really is a thing of beauty. It is so sad that its huge out pouring of carbon dioxide contributes so much to global warming.

The rail trail from the power station to Moe got us away from the traffic then after a couple hills we had a long flat road to ourselves by a canal.

We lunched in Yarragon at the Fozziegobble cafe on various organic comestibles including green smoothies which we were sure were so full of goodness that we could probably eat chips for the next seven days and still be nutritionally in the blac

We then wended our way through rolling land overlooked by the Strzelecki range. We are sure that the jersey and friesien cows could choose no better place in the world to live their bucolic lives.

Hillier than we expected

Hillier than we expected

A final climb took us to the town of Drouin for the night.

 

Day 8

Drouin to Melbourne – 143 kilometres, 689 metres climbed

The day started with a chilly descent to the West Gippsland flat lands. We rode for 28 kilometres in a straight line along the Bunyip River road. None of us had ever ridden so far in a straight line previously. The river was in fact one of a number of canals which we think we’re engineered to drain this land. Much of it now produces asparagus. There are now golden fields of asparagus fronds the spears having presumably been harvested by now.

We hit the bay at Frankston and turned into a north westerly head wind and struggled against this for the rest of the day into Melbourne. We stopped for fish and chips for lunch at Mordialloc and to photograph the beach huts at Brighton against the city skyline.

We have come to journey’s end. There is a sense of relief amongst us, but also a little wistfulness that we are parting company and won’t be settling ourselves in our saddles again tomorrow and, with only our own muscle power, crossing another 100 or more kilometres of the globe.

Adding up our daily kilometres will reveal that we did not quite ride 1000.  It was 903.  We climbed 7.447 kilometres though, which is more than climbing from the sea to the summit of Aconcagua, the highest mountain in the Andes.  It would have been nice to do an Everest.

A more accurate translation than “A journey of a thousand miles starts with a single step” of Chinese philosopher, Laozi’s saying is “A journey of a thousand li starts beneath one’s feet” (in our case beneath one’s pedal).  A li is about 500 metres so we did well more than 1000 li.  What is more is that it is a flexible measure and is reduced according to the effort required and we reckon climbing more than an Aconcagua’s worth is a pretty big effort.  So we hope those who donated on the basis of our pedaling 1000 kilometres will forgive us.

Thinking about the old Irish blessing which Virginia Haussegger gave us on departure, the road rose to meet us, sometimes quite a lot, the wind was not always at our back, but it was when we really needed it, the sun shone warm upon our faces nearly all the time and the rains fell little, but  softly when they did.  And we made it without mishap so it seems that perhaps God did hold us in the palm of his hand.

Arrival at the Bay

Arrival at the Bay

 

2 thoughts on “2- MAMIL Champions Cycling for Change in the Pacific

  1. Pingback: indigo foundation

  2. Well done chaps, what a great effort!!
    Hope you’ve all stopped to enjoy some Melb culture. And yes good to read that there were no major mishaps en route.
    Roz

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

4- BillBerry Bluestocking Fund

The BillBerry Bluestocking Fund

Educating girls for Effective Civil Society thus Effective Governance and Markets and Peace in Small Pacific Nations

Patron –  Luamanuvao Winifred “Winnie” Alexandra Laban, QSO

Why Blue Stocking, why BillBerry?  The Blue Stockings Society was an informal organisation dedicated to women’s education in mid-18th century England; an early initiative to promote gender equality and empower women.  Bill and Berry were the nicknames of two young Girl Guide leaders women who rode 8,000 kilometres around Europe in the last summer before World War Two began in 1939 and who inspired the Fund’s founders.

The Fund is dedicated to the UN Millennium Development Goal Number 3 – Promote Gender Equality and Empower Women.  Its particular focus is the Pacific Islands region where much needs to be done to raise the status of women.  An important indicator is women’s representation in national legislatures which is only about 4 per cent and thus much lower than most other parts of the world.

The intention is to assist local civil society organisations that are working to develop leadership amongst girls and young women.  Girl Guides and Scouts Associations have proved their capacity in this in a number of countries.  In the region one example is the civic education programme of the Solomon Island Girl Guides which was recognised in a study by NZAID and AusAID.  A standout example from Africa is the highly successful work of the Burundi Girl Guides Association in training women to be candidates for parliament.  A few years ago the Burundi Parliament passed a law requiring 30% of its number to be women.  Assisted with some funding from the United States, the Association trained women candidates so that the seats were filled and it continues to support them.

Globally there is no larger organisation for girls and young women than the Girl Guides Movement and arguably none better equipped to produce women leaders of the future.  It is already established in a number of Pacific nations and there are sound regional and global governance and support structures.

Initially it is planned that the Fund will support the Solomon Island Girl Guides Association to continue its civic education and leadership programme for young women.   A partnership between this fund, the indigo Foundation (http//www:indigofoundation.org), the Foundation for Effective Markets and Governance (FEMAG – http//:www.femag.org.au) has been formed for this purpose.  The fund is intended to be auspiced by the indigo Foundation.  Its capital is now close  to $80,000, but more is needed to provide sufficient annual income for this programme.  And of course much more is needed to fund similar programmes in other Pacific nations. FEMAG and the ANU’s Regulatory Institutions Network have contributed $10,000 to cover initial costs of the programme.

Since independence in 1978, only one woman has ever been elected to the Parliament of Solomon Islands.  Developing the leadership of young women means they have the potential to contest seats in Parliament in the future.  This is not of course an end in itself.  More women in parliament engenders more participation of women in public life generally and in public policy development and calling government to account in particular.  This flows on to improvements in education of girls and in health services thus family planning.  Ultimately women are better enabled as those making the main consumer and health decisions for their families.  It may well be that educating and empowering girls and young women is the best thing that can be done for a developing country once the basic needs of livelihood are provided.

The Fund’s founding donors and governors are Anna Brown, Richard Arthur, Jill McSpedden, Allan and Lois Asher and Robin Brown. They will continue to add to this amount as they are able.  Others have also generously made contributions.

This fund is part of the Greater Good Foundation (http://www.greatergood.org.au).  Donations (1 cent or 10 cents or more for every kilometre ridden in 1939 and 7 decades on perhaps!) are very welcome. For Australian citizens they are tax deductible.

Donations to grow this fund would be very much appreciated.  Donations may be made by credit card at this website: Greater Good Foundation Form

You will find a drop down menu under “to fund”.  Select BillBerry Blue Stocking Fund (indigo Foundation)

Alternatively bank transfers may be made to this account:

Account Name: Public Trustee Common Fund

BSB: 062-920   Acc No: 1003 6944

Reference: BillBerry Bluestocking Fund

For a tax deductible receipt go to http://www.greatergood.org.au/contact and send an email

Alternatively highlight the following form, copy and paste it to a document, print and post it

BillBerry Bluestocking Fund

 Donation Form

 Please fill out the following information:

* indicates a required item

Personal Details:

Mr  ⃝   Mrs  ⃝   Ms  ⃝   Miss  ⃝   Other _____________

First Name*______________________________________

Surname*_______________________________________

Address*________________________________________

______________________State*______Postcode*______

Home Phone_______________ Mobile________________

Email___________________________________________

Donation Amount* ________________

Please select payment method*

 

Credit Card

Visa  ⃝      Mastercard  ⃝      Amex  ⃝      Diners  ⃝

Card Number______________________________

Cardholder Name___________________________

Signature______________ Expiry____ /____

 

Cheque / Cash Please send your cheque made out to “BillBerry Bluestocking Fund”  to

GreaterGood

c/- Public Trustee for the ACT

PO Box 221

CIVIC SQUARE ACT 2608

GreaterGood holds Australian Taxation Office endorsement as an income tax exempt charitable entity and its Gift Fund holds Deductible Gift Recipient status. Gift Fund ABN: 33 180 890 151

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

1- Europe Twice Around – On the eve of war and seven decades on – by bicycle

Click this

Europe Twice Around

 

 

 

14 thoughts on “1- Europe Twice Around – On the eve of war and seven decades on – by bicycle

  1. Not quite as plucky as were those young ladies back in the great but ominous year of 39, but far more plucky than most others to follow in such fine wheel tracks.

    Just keep going till you get there!!

    Good luck from everyone at Burgmann College.

  2. Just finished reading the side by side journal up to your arrival in Paris. Most enjoyable read. I look forward to continuing to to follow your progress as you wend your way through Europe.

  3. what an adventure …. and hopefully you will still be feeling fit at the end . I hope you have also enough time for the nice food and wine on the way …. dibb dibb ,dobb dobb

  4. WAY TO GO, ROBIN!

    Scanning through the side by side journals (will read them fully later after my conference with farm workers here in California), i get this idea: why don’t you sell this (if you still haven’t) as a concept for a feature film using precisely this device of side-by-side and cross-time view of life on the bike, ala “Julie/Julia” but more intimate as this is you and mum ? I’m sure there’ll be takers and it would be a great addition to your fund-raising initiative, i.e., proceeds of the film moving forward. (You could have Matthew Perry to play you!:-) Kidding aside, i hope you have a video cam with you to document this fantastic voyage for a cause. I envy you, Robin. Some guys have all the luck! Keep on pedalling!

    Ed

  5. WAY TO GO, ROBIN!

    Scanning through the side by side journals (will read them fully later after my conference with farm workers here in California), i get this idea: why don’t you sell this (if you still haven’t) as a concept for a feature film using precisely this device of side-by-side and cross-time view of life on the bike, ala “Julie/Julia” but more intimate as this is you and mum ? I’m sure there’ll be takers and it would be a great addition to your fund-raising initiative, i.e., proceeds of the film moving forward. (You could have Matthew Perry to play you! Kidding aside, i hope you have a video cam with you to document this fantastic voyage for a cause. I envy you, Robin. Some guys have all the luck! Keep on pedalling!

    Ed

  6. Well done Robin and friends.It has been very interesting for ourselves and Joan Cole to follow your progress.Well done to all of you.We would be interested to receive an e-mail about your return home and your plans for next year.
    Best wishes from all of us.Bob Jane and Joan.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s